Prevent Type 2 Diabetes

Can I Prevent Type 2 Diabetes?

Yes! Hearing your doctor say, “You’re at risk for type 2 diabetes,” or “You have prediabetes,” means that you can start preventing type 2 diabetes today. And you do not have to do it alone. Finding a Lifestyle Change Program in Minnesota is your first step on that journey. If you have prediabetes, now is the time for prevention. We can help you take charge of your health to prevent or delay type 2 diabetes.

Am I at Risk for Prediabetes and Type 2 Diabetes?

You are at increased risk for developing prediabetes and type 2 diabetes if you:

  • Are 45 years of age or older;
  • Are overweight;
  • Have a family history of type 2 diabetes;
  • Are physically active fewer than three times per week; or
  • Ever had diabetes while pregnant (gestational diabetes) or gave birth to a baby that weighed more than 9 pounds.

If you think you may be at risk, call your health care provider and ask for a blood test to see if you have diabetes or prediabetes.

Does a Lifestyle Change Program Work?

The Diabetes Prevention Program can help people with prediabetes make lifestyle changes that can cut their risk of developing type 2 diabetes in half.

You will work with other participants and a trained lifestyle coach to learn the skills you need to make lasting changes. These changes include losing a modest amount of weight, being more physically active, and managing stress.

Being part of a group provides support from other people who are facing similar challenges and trying to make the same changes you are. Together you can celebrate successes and find ways to overcome obstacles.

What Is the Format of a Lifestyle Change Program?

Diabetes prevention groups meet once a week for 16 weeks, then once a month for 6 months to maintain healthy lifestyle changes. During each session, your lifestyle coach will teach a lesson and lead a group discussion.

For example, you will learn to:

  • Eat healthy
  • Add physical activity to your life
  • Manage stress
  • Stay on track when eating out
  • Understand and respond to your food cues
  • Stay motivated
  • Solve problems that can get in the way of healthy changes

 

 photograph courtesy of Frogtown Square Neighborhood Development Center